Barcolana

A walkthrough over the work involved in our short doc for Barcolana: world’s most crowded sailboat race.


Barcolana from Pablo Apiolazza on Vimeo.

Barcolana is world’s most crowded sailboat race. Each year during the second sunday of October, more than 1700 sailboats gather up at the Gulf of Trieste to compete in one unique race.
This year the Barcolana Organization decided to celebrate its 46th edition building from scratch a wooden boat. In that context we were contacted to produce a short doc telling the story but mostly the spirit of Barcolana. A very complex task, and one of great responsibility, by the traditional character of the event, so full of history and emotions.

While thinking about the storytelling, we decided that it shouldn’t be the usual story of a sailboat race like so many others around, but about what’s behind such a big event like Barcolana.
We wanted to go deeper, catching the details, the emotions and the feelings of all of those who are so bonded with the sailing world, including Trieste citizens. Old and young, pros or amateurs, sailors, fans or merely observers.

"In quale altra città d’Italia vedi da una piazza le alpi,il mare,traghetti partire per il bosforo?" #ttot #trieste pic.twitter.com/MEGL2IA5mS

APZ media (@APZmedia) October 18, 2014

The race has a primary and symbolic origin in an undeclarerd race from history: the one of the fishing boats from the coast of Dalmatia to the huge ports of Trieste and Venice. Those boats that arrived first were the ones that could secure the freshness of fish and therefor its selling. During centuries this “race” repeated till the arrival of modern times and the industrial methods of fishing and fish conservation. In other words, until the arrival of the freezer.

Un bellissimo ricordo con Mario Mallardi, il meraviglioso maestro d'ascia dello "Skeet", … http://t.co/cidDaEk0JQ pic.twitter.com/77Vm2w3PEf

APZ media (@APZmedia) October 6, 2014

The boat and its construction was commissioned to the Alto Adriatico Shipyard, and the master shipwright Mario Mallardi, a true artist. It was a great pleasure to work with him and the people in the shipyard, that always helped us. The words from Mario were a great inspiration and also the voiceover from the prelude video of Barcolana: Shipwright

Shipwright – Come nasce una barca from Pablo Apiolazza on Vimeo.

To tell in such a short time something happened decades or centuries ago we made an archive research with Federica Raffin, in collaboration with the Sea Museum of Trieste, and guided by Walter Macovaz, a true connaisseur of Trieste’s history and its sea.
The research was completed with the help of Ranieri Favetta, that guided us in the choosing of the archive material.
The storic sequence at the beginning of the film wouln’t be the same without the postcards courtesy of the Bottega del francobollo e del usato, from Trieste. Through their images we were able to reproduce thanks to motion graphics, the passing of time of a city so rich in history as Trieste

The participation of italian journalist Paolo Rumiz was a great piece of the puzzle for the tone of the film. His words allowed us to have a poetic voice that takes us thru the spirit behind boats, sailing and the race, but mostly the importance of all this for the city of Trieste.

For the soundtrack we worked with our favourite composer, the talented Ian Blumfield, that composed the orchestral Chasing Dreams, that manages to transmit the epicness and all the depth of the sailing world in only four minutes. To reproduce the ancient Trieste and the passing of time we had some help from our dear friend Aniol Marin.

During the race we had the support of Gabitto Visintin, argentinian sports photographer on a service boat as a second unit. The documentary was filmed entirely with real Barcolana participants like Andrea Micalli from DHL’s Drake Passage, and the crew of Flora, Tiziana IV and Osama, that gave us a warmth welcome and were the protagonists of many action scenes.

The aditional imagery was made by the talented video crew from Barcolana, composed by Ettore Spezza, Alberto Alesse, Francesco Ferri y Federico Favretto.

The final piece was premiered during Barcolana’s Award ceremony, at the Saturnia room in Stazione Marittima.

It’s hard to transmit the satisfaction and pleasure to be able to show and tell such a big event, with so many stories that come together in one unique, with a common nexus: the profound and authentic love for the sea.


comments powered by Disqus

You might also want to read

Do you like what we do? We're sharing our process.

Sign up, and we'll send you news and insight on visual storytelling, media strategy and remote collaboration, fresh from our experience.


Choose the content of your interest:

Do you have a project? Let's do it together!

Contact us